logo logo
 
 
SmartSection is developed by The SmartFactory (http://www.smartfactory.ca), a division of INBOX Solutions (http://inboxinternational.com)
Microtubule Expression
Published by Anonymous on 2007/9/28 (1424 reads)
1: Microsc Res Tech. 2000 Jan 15;48(2):63-74.


MAP1B expression and microtubule stability in growing and regenerating axons.

Gordon-Weeks PR, Fischer I.

Centre for Developmental Neurobiology, GKT School of Biomedical Sciences, King's College London, London WC2B 5RL. phillip.gordon-weeks@kcl.ac.uk

MAP1B is a microtubule-associated phosphoprotein that is particularly highly expressed in developing neurons. There is experimental evidence that it plays an important role in neuronal differentiation, especially the extension of axons and dendrites, but exactly what role is unclear. Recent experiments have shed light on the gene structure of MAP1B and identified some of the kinases that phosphorylate the protein. Implicit in these findings is the idea that MAP1B regulates the organisation of microtubules in neurites and is itself regulated in a complex way and at a number of levels. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Publication Types:
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

PMID: 10649507 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2: Int J Dev Biol. 1994 Mar;38(1):13-25.


Regulation of microtubule dynamics by microtubule-associated protein expression and phosphorylation during neuronal development.

Avila J, Domínguez J, Díaz-Nido J.

Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa, Universidad Autónoma, Madrid, Spain.

Neuronal morphogenesis is driven by cytoskeletal changes in which microtubules play a leading role. A very heterogeneous group of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) seems to control the dynamics and contribute to the organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Of great importance in this regard is the developmental regulation of the expression of certain MAPs in specific neuronal compartments. Furthermore, MAP functionality is also modulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events. A correlation between the expression and/or phosphorylation of distinct MAPs and definite stages of neuronal development may be established. A putative role in synaptic plasticity for MAP modifications similar to those occurring during development can be anticipated. Interestingly, gross alterations in microtubule-associated proteins are found in several neuropathologies including Alzheimer's disease. In this review we focus on recent advances in the understanding of the molecular properties of major neuronal MAPs which may be relevant to these issues.

Publication Types:
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

PMID: 8074993 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

3: Cell Motil Cytoskeleton. 1994;28(3):195-8.


Microtubule-associated protein function: lessons from expression in Spodoptera frugiperda cells.

Kosik KS, McConlogue L.

Harvard Medical School, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston.

The phenotypes induced by the expression of neuronal microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) in Sf9 cells have provided data on the in situ function of these proteins. Both MAP2 and tau can induce long processes in Sf9 cells, and the processes contain bundles of microtubules. In both cases the microtubules are aligned with their plus ends distal. Tau expression usually induces a single process that is unbranched and of uniform caliber. Processes can form even when the cells are grown in suspension. Microtubules do not extend all the way to the tip; instead the terminal region contains an actin-rich meshwork. Taxol treatment of Sf9 cells also induces the assembly of microtubules into bundles but does not induce process formation in Sf9 cells. Therefore the in vitro properties of tau as a molecule capable of assembling, stabilizing, and bundling microtubules do not fully account for the in vivo ability of tau alone to transduce microtubule assembly into a change in cell shape. The morphological features of the processes induced by MAP2 differ in highly informative ways.

Publication Types:
Review

PMID: 7954847 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

4: Methods Cell Biol. 1993;39:115-27.


Expression of microtubule motor proteins in bacteria for characterization in in vitro motility assays.

Chandra R, Endow SA.

Department of Microbiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710.

Publication Types:
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

PMID: 8246792 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

5: Dev Neurosci. 1986;8(3):125-41.


Differential expression of microtubule components during brain development.

Nunez J.

Publication Types:
Review

PMID: 3533503 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
 

Navigate through the articles
Microtubule Structure Next article
Copyright © 2007-2008 by Biologicalworld.com