logo logo
 
 
SmartSection is developed by The SmartFactory (http://www.smartfactory.ca), a division of INBOX Solutions (http://inboxinternational.com)
Intermediate Filament Expression
Published by Anonymous on 2007/9/28 (1703 reads)
1: Prog Retin Eye Res. 2002 Mar;21(2):241-62.


Intermediate-filament expression in ocular tissue.

Pitz S, Moll R.

Department of Ophthalmology, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Langenbeckstr. 1, D-55101 Mainz, Germany. pitz@augen.klinik.uni-mainz.de

Intermediate-filament proteins (IFPs) occur in the intracellular cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells, and their expression in diverse tissues is related both to embryology as well as to differentiation. Although the available information concerning their functional properties in vivo is still incomplete, antibodies against individual IFPs are commonly used in immunohistochemical procedures as markers for differentiation, and these antibodies are of outstanding value in the routine histopathological evaluation of tumor specimens. This review presents a compilation of the currently available data concerning IFP expression in normal and diseased ocular tissues. Representatives of every known class of IFP have been detected in normal ocular tissues. The external epithelia exhibit complex expression patterns of cytokeratin (CK) polypeptides, with CK3 and CK12 being specific markers of the corneal epithelium. Recent research has revealed that single mutant CK polypeptides may play a role in the pathogenesis of corneal dystrophies. The internal ocular epithelia reveal simple but specific patterns of IFP expression, these comprising simple-epithelial CKs and/or the mesenchymal IFP, vimentin. The IFP complement of the neuronal structures of the eye embraces several distinct IFP classes and reflects the diversity of the cell types present at these sites. With respect to ocular tumors, the IFP profile of melanomas might be correlated with metastatic potential. In conclusion, IFP analysis may be able to cast light on the pathogenesis of ocular diseases, as well as being a valuable adjunct in ophthalmopathological diagnosis.

Publication Types:
Review

PMID: 12062536 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2: Cancer Metastasis Rev. 1996 Dec;15(4):473-82.


Intermediate filament expression in prostate cancer.

Nagle RB.

Department of Pathology, University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson 85724-5043, USA.

The human prostate is composed of a series of tubular-alveolar glands and their ducts surrounded by a fibro-muscular stroma. The parenchymal glands secrete the seminal fluid and are anatomically arranged into the central, peripheral, and transitional zones. In this chapter the pattern of intermediate filament expression by the various epithelial components of the ducts, tubuloalveolar glands, and stroma are described. The changes which occur during malignant transformation from normal glands to prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and subsequent invasive carcinoma are presented. The usefulness of cytokeratin markers in the diagnosis of prostate carcinoma is also discussed.

Publication Types:
Review

PMID: 9034604 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

3: Cancer Treat Res. 1992;61:355-78.


Intermediate filament protein expression in normal and malignant human mammary epithelial cells.

Taylor-Papadimitriou J, Wetzels R, Ramaekers F.

Publication Types:
Review

PMID: 1280457 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

4: Curr Opin Cell Biol. 1991 Feb;3(1):67-74.


Regulation of intermediate filament gene expression.

Zehner ZE.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond 23298.

Members of the intermediate filament protein family exhibit complex patterns of development-specific and tissue-specific expression. Studies exploring the mechanisms of gene regulation are underway and key regulatory factors are currently being described and isolated for certain genes encoding intermediate filament proteins. Selected systems from this diverse group of about 50 genes will be discussed.

Publication Types:
Review

PMID: 1854486 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

5: Verh Dtsch Ges Pathol. 1991;75:446-59.


[Differentiation and new differentiation reflected in intermediate filament expression: investigation of normal, aged and malignant with emphasis on cytokeratin]

[Article in German]

Moll R.

Institut für Pathologie, Universität Mainz.

Publication Types:
Comparative Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

PMID: 1724851 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

6: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1990;588:225-35.


Precocious expression of NAPA-73, an intermediate filament-associated protein, during nervous system and heart development in the chicken embryo.

Ciment G.

Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Vollum Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland 97201.

A monoclonal antibody was generated, against early neural crest-derived cells, which recognizes an epitope present on a novel intermediate filament-associated protein. This protein has been named NAPA-73 and is expressed by progenitor cells of the nervous system and heart. Biochemical and ultrastructural studies indicate that this protein associates with bundles of intermediate filaments and therefore may play a role in the determination of cell shape.

Publication Types:
Review

PMID: 1694066 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

7: Klin Wochenschr. 1988;66 Suppl 11:80-6.


Differentiation markers as an aid in the histological diagnosis of small-cell carcinoma of the lung: synopsis of intermediate filament protein and synaptophysin expression.

Leube RE, Wiedenmann B, Franke WW.

Institut für Zell- und Tumorbiologie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg.

Small-cell carcinomas of the lung (SCLCs) are frequent tumors of the bronchopulmonary tract which are distinguished by their neuroendocrine (NE) features, indicative of a derivation from the sparse neuroendocrine cells present in the normal epithelium. Because of the lack of marked morphological details, the differential diagnosis of this tumor is very difficult. We show that the epithelial nature and origin of SCLCs can be demonstrated, biochemically and immunocytochemically, by the expression of cytokeratins, notably cytokeratins 8 and 18, often together with desmosomal proteins as another independent differentiation marker. The NE character of SCLCs, on the other hand, is revealed by antibodies to certain NE-specific components, notably the broad range NE marker, the membrane protein synaptophysin. Both kinds of differentiation markers are also expressed in a number of SCLC-derived cultured cell lines which therefore may serve as valuable biological model systems to study the biology of SCLC.

Publication Types:
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

PMID: 2846953 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

8: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1985;455:144-57.


Expression of the genes coding for the intermediate filament proteins vimentin and desmin.

Ngai J, Capetanaki YG, Lazarides E.

Publication Types:
In Vitro
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

PMID: 3909879 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

9: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1985;455:68-78.


Are intermediate filament proteins involved in gene expression?

Traub P.

Publication Types:
Review

PMID: 2867728 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
 

Navigate through the articles
Intermediate Filament Structure Next article
Copyright © 2007-2008 by Biologicalworld.com