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Opioid Receptor Expression
Published by Anonymous on 2007/9/30 (1542 reads)
1: Adv Exp Med Biol. 2003;521:98-105.


Opioid receptor expression and intracellular signaling by cells involved in host defense and immunity.

Sharp BM.

Department of Pharmacology, University of Tennessee, Memphis, USA.

More than two decades ago, Joseph Wybran reported his original insights on the expression of different opioid receptor types by T-cells. This was based on the differential effects that morphine and methionine enkephalin exerted on human T-cell rosetting in the presence of sheep red blood cells. Since that time, numerous laboratories have shown that opiate alkyloids and opioid peptides have pleiotropic effects on immune function. In general, these compounds act as immunomodulators that modify the immune response to mitogens, antigens and antibodies that cross-link the T-cell receptor. In the past decade, it has become clear that cells involved in host defense and immunity express the various mRNAs encoding the same opioid receptors originally identified in neuronal tissues. Recently, indirect fluorescence and immunofluorescence have been utilized to demonstrate the regulated expression of both delta and kappa opioid receptors, predominantly on T-cells. In addition, immune cells express sites that show atypical opiate and opioid binding properties. In this review, we will distill the evidence for both classical and atypical opioid receptors and their effects on signaling within immune cells, focusing on the T-cell and emphasizing the delta opioid receptor.

Publication Types:
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

PMID: 12617568 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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2: Curr Opin Pharmacol. 2002 Feb;2(1):69-75.


Regulation of opioid receptor expression.

Wei LN, Loh HH.

Department of Pharmacology, University of Minnesota Medical School, 6-120 Jackson Hall, 321 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455-0217, USA. weixx009@tc.umn.edu

The cloning of the mu, delta and kappa opioid receptor genes in the early 1990s has allowed the genetic determinants that control the expression of each opioid receptor to be dissected. Regulation of these genes involves transcriptional and post-transcriptional events. At the transcriptional level, most recent studies have revealed both positive and negative roles for various transcription factors, vitamin A hormones and cytokines in opioid receptor gene regulation. Post-transcriptional events involve alternative splicing and variation in mRNA stability and translation efficiency of these gene transcripts. Reports have also shown polymorphisms of the mu opioid receptor gene, primarily in the regulatory region, suggesting a potential connection between this gene and the likelihood of opioid abuse in humans.

Publication Types:
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

PMID: 11786311 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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3: Adv Exp Med Biol. 1998;437:59-65.


Opioid receptor gene expression in the porcine immune system.

Pampusch MS, Osinski MA, Serie JR, Murtaugh MP, Brown DR.

Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA.

Publication Types:
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

PMID: 9666257 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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4: Masui. 1995;44 Suppl:S119-20.


[Cloning and expression of cDNA for the opioid receptor]

[Article in Japanese]

Fukuda K.

Publication Types:
Review

PMID: 8544305 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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5: Trends Neurosci. 1995 Jan;18(1):22-9.


Opioid-receptor mRNA expression in the rat CNS: anatomical and functional implications.

Mansour A, Fox CA, Akil H, Watson SJ.

Mental Health Research Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

The cloning of the opioid receptors has profoundly affected our understanding of opioid-receptor expression, regulation and function. This review focuses on the impact that cloning has had on our understanding of opioid-receptor anatomy, and provides broad anatomical maps of the three opioid-receptor mRNAs in relation to their binding sites. In addition, three model anatomical systems, the nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopamine systems, the hypothalamic neuroendocrine axes, and the ascending and descending pain pathways, have been highlighted to discuss issues of receptor transport, trafficking and pre- versus postsynaptic localization.

Publication Types:
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

PMID: 7535487 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
 

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